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research-article

Comparison of grasping performance of two transmission systems in electric powered low cost hand prostheses

[+] Author and Article Information
Javier Andrés

Department of Mechanical Engineering and Construction − Universitat Jaume I, Castellón, Spain; F. Javier Andrés de la Esperanza, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Construction − Universitat Jaume I, Av. de Vicent Sos Baynat, s/n, 12071 Castellón (Spain)
fandres@uji.es

Antonio Pérez González

Department of Mechanical Engineering and Construction − Universitat Jaume I, Castellón, Spain, Antonio Pérez González, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Construction − Universitat Jaume I, Av. de Vicent Sos Baynat, s/n, 12071 Castellón (Spain)
aperez@uji.es

Carlos Rubert

Department of Computer Science and Engineering- Universitat Jaume I, Castellón, Spain; Carlos Rubert Escuder, Department of Computer Science and Engineering- Universitat Jaume I, Av. de Vicent Sos Baynat, s/n, 12071 Castellón (Spain)
cescuder@uji.es

Jose Fuentes Ballesteros

Department of Mechanical Engineering and Construction − Universitat Jaume I, Castellón, Spain; José Fuentes Ballesteros, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Construction − Universitat Jaume I, Av. de Vicent Sos Baynat, s/n, 12071 Castellón (Spain)
ffuentes@uji.es

Bruno Sospedra Grino

Department of Mechanical Engineering and Construction − Universitat Jaume I, Castellón, Spain; Bruno Sospedra Griñó, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Construction − Universitat Jaume I, Av. de Vicent Sos Baynat, s/n, 12071 Castellón (Spain)
al132267@uji.es

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4040491 History: Received January 09, 2018; Revised May 25, 2018

Abstract

The popularization of fused deposition modelling technology and open-source microcontrollers have permitted the explosion of electric hand prostheses that can be designed, shared, built and operated at a low-cost, under the Do It Yourself premise. Patients with limb reductions at the transcarpal or transradial level are best candidates to benefit from them. They manage the gross location with the remaining limb, while the built-in motors offer the possibility of controlling each finger independently. The number of mobile joints along the finger and the type of transmission can determine the quality of the grasp. Moreover, there is a need of objective procedures to assess the functionality of complete prototypes at reasonable effort. This work makes a critical review of the different transmission systems that can be found in most low-cost finger designs: linkage and tendon mechanisms. Mechanical performance has been analyzed using a standardized model of the index finger. Furthermore, robotic Grasp Quality Metrics have been used to evaluate by simulation the functionality of complete devices. Neither finger transmission design appeared clearly advantageous in the range of flexion studied. The evaluation of the complete devices gave slightly better quality grades for the linkage-driven model. Instead, tendon-driven model achieved a greater quantity of successful grasps. In the current state-of-art, some other aspects may have led to a dominant situation of the tendon-driven hands: less number of parts to be printed, easier assembly for a non-expert user, advantageous in pursuit of lightweight devices.

Copyright (c) 2018 by ASME
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