0
Design Innovation Paper

Efficient Mechanism Design and Systematic Operation Planning for Tube-Wire Flexible Needles

[+] Author and Article Information
Jaeyeon Lee

Mem. ASME
Department of Electrical Engineering,
University of Texas at Dallas,
Richardson, TX 75080
e-mail: jaeyeon.lee2902@gmail.com

Jing Wang

Associate Professor
Department of Radiation Oncology,
UT Southwestern Medical Center,
Dallas, TX 75390
e-mail: jing.wang@utsouthwestern.edu

Wooram Park

Clinical Associate Professor
Mem. ASME
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
University of Texas at Dallas,
Richardson, TX 75080
e-mail: wooram.park@utdallas.edu

1Present address: ColubrisMX Inc., Houston, TX 77054.

Contributed by the Mechanisms and Robotics Committee of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF MECHANISMS AND ROBOTICS. Manuscript received April 11, 2018; final manuscript received August 11, 2018; published online September 17, 2018. Assoc. Editor: Nabil Simaan.

J. Mechanisms Robotics 10(6), 065001 (Sep 17, 2018) (9 pages) Paper No: JMR-18-1099; doi: 10.1115/1.4041259 History: Received April 11, 2018; Revised August 11, 2018

Needles are widely used in medicine for minimally invasive procedures. A steerable flexible needle was first introduced about 15 years ago, which was a new type of needle and could follow three-dimensional curved trajectory during medical procedures. The flexible needle has the limit of a single and low curvature. In this paper, we overcome this limit by designing mechanisms for tube-wire type flexible needles. We also provide a systematic planning method for an automated operation of the needle insertion using the mechanisms. Using the new system, we can achieve high and multiple curvatures from needle trajectories. The proposed design consists of an inner prebent wire and an outer tube, which are connected to two special mechanisms, an extension switch and a friction cart. It allows the trajectory of the needle to have high and multiple curvatures, which will enable the needle to easily reach target positions while efficiently avoiding obstacles. Users can efficiently control the needle device with simple inputs (insertion and rotation) using the special operation mechanism, which achieves three system functions (insertion/retraction, rotation, curvature changes) using only two actuation motors. Compared to prebent needles or duty-cycled spinning, this needle design causes less tissue damage. We build an automatic system to operate the new design of the steerable needle and test it. The performance of the new needle is verified by experiments with ballistic gelatin and animal tissue samples.

Copyright © 2018 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Park, W. , Kim, J. , Zhou, Y. , Cowan, N. , Okamura, A. , and Chirikjian, G. , 2005, “ Diffusion-Based Motion Planning for a Nonholonomic Flexible Needle Model,” IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), Barcelona, Spain, Apr. 18–22, pp. 4600–4605.
Webster , R. J., III , Kim, J. S. , Cowan, N. J. , Chirikjian, G. S. , and Okamura, A. M. , 2006, “ Nonholonomic Modeling of Needle Steering,” Int. J. Rob. Res., 25(5–6), pp. 509–525. [CrossRef]
Park, W. , Wang, Y. , and Chirikjian, G. S. , 2010, “ The Path-of-Probability Algorithm for Steering and Feedback Control of Flexible Needles,” Int. J. Rob. Res., 29(7), pp. 813–830. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
Duindam, V. , Xu, J. , Alterovitz, R. , Sastry, S. , and Goldberg, K. , 2010, “ Three-Dimensional Motion Planning Algorithms for Steerable Needles Using Inverse Kinematics,” Int. J. Rob. Res., 29(7), pp. 789–800. [CrossRef]
Xu, J. , Duindam, V. , Alterovitz, R. , Pouliot, J. , Cunha, J. A. M. , Hsu, I. , and Goldberg, K. , 2009, “ Planning Fireworks Trajectories for Steerable Medical Needles to Reduce Patient Trauma,” IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS), St. Louis, MO, Oct. 10–15, pp. 4517–4522.
Duindam, V. , Alterovitz, R. , Sastry, S. , and Goldberg, K. , 2008, “ Screw-Based Motion Planning for Bevel-Tip Flexible Needles in 3D Environments With Obstacles,” IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), Pasadena, CA, May. 19–23, pp. 2483–2488.
Van Den Berg, J. , Patil, S. , Alterovitz, R. , Abbeel, P. , and Goldberg, K. , 2011, “ LQG-Based Planning, Sensing, and Control of Steerable Needles,” Algorithmic Foundations of Robotics IX, Hsu, D. , Isler, V. , Latombe, J. C. , Lin, M. C. , eds., Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg, pp. 373–389.
Asadian, A. , Kermani, M. R. , and Patel, R. V. , 2011, “ Robot-Assisted Needle Steering Using a Control Theoretic Approach,” J. Intell. Rob. Syst., 62(3–4), pp. 397–418. [CrossRef]
Hauser, K. , Alterovitz, R. , Chentanez, N. , Okamura, A. , and Goldberg, K. , 2009, “ Feedback Control for Steering Needles Through 3D Deformable Tissue Using Helical Paths,” Robotics Science and Systems: Online Proceedings, Vol. 37.
Kallem, V. , and Cowan, N. J. , 2009, “ Image Guidance of Flexible Tip-Steerable Needles,” IEEE Trans. Rob., 25(1), pp. 191–196. [CrossRef]
Glozman, D. , and Shoham, M. , 2007, “ Image-Guided Robotic Flexible Needle Steering,” IEEE Trans. Rob., 23(3), pp. 459–467. [CrossRef]
Neubach, Z. , and Shoham, M. , 2010, “ Ultrasound-Guided Robot for Flexible Needle Steering,” IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng., 57(4), pp. 799–805. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
Abayazid, M. , Moreira, P. , Shahriari, N. , Patil, S. , Alterovitz, R. , and Misra, S. , 2014, “ Ultrasound-Guided Three-Dimensional Needle Steering in Biological Tissue With Curved Surfaces,” Med. Eng. Phys., 37(1), pp. 145–150. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
Adebar, T. K. , Fletcher, A. E. , and Okamura, A. M. , 2014, “ 3D Ultrasound-Guided Robotic Needle Steering in Biological Tissue,” IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng., 61(12), pp. 2899–2910. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
Misra, S. , Reed, K. B. , Schafer, B. W. , Ramesh, K. , and Okamura, A. M. , 2010, “ Mechanics of Flexible Needles Robotically Steered Through Soft Tissue,” Int. J. Rob. Res., 29(13), pp. 1640–1660. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
Webster, R. J. , Memisevic, J. , and Okamura, A. M. , 2005, “ Design Considerations for Robotic Needle Steering,” IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), Barcelona, Spain, Apr. 18–22, pp. 3588–3594.
Alterovitz, R. , Goldberg, K. , and Okamura, A. , 2005, “ Planning for Steerable Bevel-Tip Needle Insertion Through 2D Soft Tissue With Obstacles,” IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), Barcelona, Spain, Apr. 18–22, pp. 1640–1645.
Lee, J. , and Park, W. , 2013, “ Insertion Planning for Steerable Flexible Needles Reaching Multiple Planar Targets,” IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS), Tokyo, Japan, Nov. 3–7, pp. 2377–2383.
Wedlick, T. R. , and Okamura, A. M. , 2009, “ Characterization of Pre-Curved Needles for Steering in Tissue,” Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC), Minneapolis, MN, Nov. 13 pp. 1200–1203.
Minhas, D. S. , Engh, J. A. , Fenske, M. M. , and Riviere, C. N. , 2007, “ Modeling of Needle Steering Via Duty-Cycled Spinning,” IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBS), Lyon, France, Aug. 22–26, pp. 2756–2759.
Swaney, P. J. , Burgner, J. , Gilbert, H. B. , and Webster, R. J. , 2013, “ A Flexure-Based Steerable Needle: High Curvature With Reduced Tissue Damage,” IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng., 60(4), pp. 906–909. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
Okazawa, S. , Ebrahimi, R. , Chuang, J. , Salcudean, S. E. , and Rohling, R. , 2005, “ Hand-Held Steerable Needle Device,” IEEE/ASME Trans. Mechatronics, 10(3), pp. 285–296. [CrossRef]
Ko, S. Y. , Davies, B. L. , and Rodriguez y Baena, F. , 2010, “ Two-Dimensional Needle Steering With a Programmable Bevel Inspired by Nature: Modeling Preliminaries,” IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS), Taipei, Taiwan, Oct. 18–22, pp. 2319–2324.
Ko, S. Y. , and y Baena, F. R. , 2013, “ Toward a Miniaturized Needle Steering System With Path Planning for Obstacle Avoidance,” IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng., 60(4), pp. 910–917. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
Ayvali, E. , Ho, M. , and Desai, J. P. , 2014, “ A Novel Discretely Actuated Steerable Probe for Percutaneous Procedures,” Experimental Robotics, Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg, pp. 115–123.
Ayvali, E. , Liang, C.-P. , Ho, M. , Chen, Y. , and Desai, J. P. , 2012, “ Towards a Discretely Actuated Steerable Cannula for Diagnostic and Therapeutic Procedures,” Int. J. Rob. Res., 31(5), pp. 588–603. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
Shahriari, N. , Roesthuis, R. J. , van de Berg, N. J. , van den Dobbelsteen, J. J. , and Misra, S. , 2016, “ Steering an Actuated-Tip Needle in Biological Tissue: Fusing fbg-Sensor Data and Ultrasound Images,” IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), Stockholm, Sweden, May 16–21, pp. 4443–4449.
Bui, V. K. , Park, S. , Park, J. O. , and Ko, S. Y. , 2016, “ A Novel Curvature-Controllable Steerable Needle for Percutaneous Intervention,” Proc. Inst. Mech. Eng., J. Eng. Med., 230(8), pp. 727–738. [CrossRef]
Reed, K. B. , Majewicz, A. , Kallem, V. , Alterovitz, R. , Goldberg, K. , Cowan, N. J. , and Okamura, A. M. , 2011, “ Robot-Assisted Needle Steering,” IEEE Rob. Autom. Mag., 18(4), pp. 35–46. [CrossRef]
Abayazid, M. , Pacchierotti, C. , Moreira, P. , Alterovitz, R. , Prattichizzo, D. , and Misra, S. , 2015, “ Experimental Evaluation of Co-Manipulated Ultrasound-Guided Flexible Needle Steering,” Int. J. Medical Rob., 12(2), pp. 219–230.
Misra, S. , Reed, K. B. , Schafer, B. W. , Ramesh, K. , and Okamura, A. M. , 2009, “ Observations and Models for Needle-Tissue Interactions,” IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), Minneapolis, MN, Sept. 3–6, pp. 2687–2692.
Park, W. , Reed, K. B. , Okamura, A. M. , and Chirikjian, G. S. , 2010, “ Estimation of Model Parameters for Steerable Needles,” IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), Anchorage, AK, May 3–7, pp. 3703–3708.
Reed, K. B. , Kallem, V. , Alterovitz, R. , Goldbergxz, K. , Okamura, A. M. , and Cowan, N. J. , 2008, “ Integrated Planning and Image-Guided Control for Planar Needle Steering,” 2nd IEEE RAS & EMBS International Conference on Biomedical Robotics and Biomechatronics (BioRob), Scottsdale, AZ, Oct. 19–22, pp. 819–824.

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Design of the extendable needle set. (a) Full extension and (b) full retraction.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

A peg-and-slot mechanism. The relative position of the two blocks can be changed through the operation from (b) to (e).

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Design of the extension switch. Assembled needle set and exploded view.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Drawing of the friction cart. (a) back view, (b) top view, and (c) side view.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Assembly of the needle operation system

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Automatic needle insertion system

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

(a) Extension switch, (b) switch part, and (c) needle end

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Friction cart (a) Schematic (back view), (b) back view, (c) top view, and (d) side view

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

An example operation: change from Phases 1 to 3

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

Experiment with CT scanning

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 11

Multiple needle curvatures in ballistic gelatin. (a) Overlapped needle images and (b) a plot of needle trajectories.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 12

(a) Three-dimensional reconstruction and (b) a slice image of needle insertion in cow liver

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 13

Multiple curvatures of the new needle inserted in a cow liver

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 14

Multiple curvatures of the new needle inserted in a beef

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 15

An example of multiple curvatures in a single needle trajectory. (a) Insertion with Phase 0, (b) insertion with Phase 3, and (c) the whole trajectory with two curvatures.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 16

Rotation of (a) a prebent needle and (b) a new needle set

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 17

Tissue damage comparison (a) Tissue damage by the traditional prebent needle with 360 deg rotation, (b) tissue damage by the prebent wire inside of the outer tube (the new needle with the minimum curvature, K0) with 360 deg rotation

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 18

Tissue damage of existing flexible needles (a) bevel tip needle and (b) symmetric needle

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 19

Cross section image obtained by CT (a) Needle in beef with K1 curvature and (b) Needle in beef with K3 curvature

Tables

Errata

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In