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research-article

GEOMETRY OF TRANSFORMABLE METAMATERIALS INSPIRED BY MODULAR ORIGAMI

[+] Author and Article Information
Yunfang Yang

Department of Engineering Science, University of Oxford, Magdalen College, Oxford, OX1 4AU, U.K.
yunfang.yang@eng.ox.ac.uk

Zhong You

Department of Engineering Science, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PJ, U.K.
zhong.you@eng.ox.ac.uk

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4038969 History: Received September 12, 2017; Revised December 13, 2017

Abstract

Modular origami is a type of origami where multiple pieces of paper are folded into modules, and these modules are then interlocked with each other forming an assembly. Some of them turn out to be capable of large scale shape transformation, making them ideal to create metamaterials with tuned mechanical properties. In this paper, we examine 2D modular origami assemblies using mathematical tiling and patterns and carry out mechanism analysis, which leads to the development of various patterns consisting of interconnected quadrilateral modules. Due to the existence of 4R linkages within the patterns, they become transformable, and can be compactly packaged. Moreover, by the introduction of paired modules, we are able to adjust the expansion ratio of the pattern. Moreover, we demonstrate that transformable patterns with higher mobility exist for other polygonal modules. Our findings provide more design flexibility to achieve truly programmable metamaterials.

Copyright (c) 2018 by ASME
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