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Research Papers

Motion Generation of Passive Slider Multiloop Wearable Hand Devices

[+] Author and Article Information
Guan Rong Tan

Robotics Innovation Laboratory,
Singapore University of Technology and Design,
Singapore 487372, Singapore
e-mail: guanrtan@gmail.com

Nina Patarinsky Robson

Mechanical Engineering Department,
California State University,
Fullerton, CA 92843
e-mail: nrobson@fullerton.edu

Gim Song Soh

Engineering Product Development,
Singapore University of Technology and Design,
Singapore 487372, Singapore
e-mail: sohgimsong@sutd.edu.sg

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received October 16, 2016; final manuscript received April 10, 2017; published online May 17, 2017. Assoc. Editor: Hai-Jun Su.

J. Mechanisms Robotics 9(4), 041011 (May 17, 2017) (9 pages) Paper No: JMR-16-1311; doi: 10.1115/1.4036611 History: Received October 16, 2016; Revised April 10, 2017

This paper describes a dimensional synthesis method used in the design of a passive finger exoskeleton that takes into account the user limb anthropometric dimensions and contact requirements for grasping objects. The paper is the first step in our current efforts on the design of wearable devices that use a common slider at the hand to passively drive each exofinger. The finger exoskeleton is comprised of a 3R serial limb and is constrained to multiloop eight-bar slider mechanism using two RR constraints. To design the exolimb, the pose of the limb was captured using an optical motion capture and its dimensions were determined using a constrained least square optimization, which takes into account human skin movement. To illustrate the generality of our approach, an example of the design of an index and middle finger exolimb is described.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

The kinematics of hand and its associated joints

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Fig. 2

The design process for task-orientated wearable devices that incorporate anthropometric backbone chain

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Fig. 3

A 3R limb with markers attachment for pose capture and our convention for the body attached frame

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Fig. 4

Model of a Planar 3R chain

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Fig. 5

The velocity and acceleration of a task pose is related to contact and curvature specifications between the fingers and the grasped body

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Fig. 6

The linkage-based finger device

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Fig. 7

The four different ways that two RR links can be added to a parallel 3R-PRR chain dependently to yield an eight-bar slider linkage

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Fig. 8

The four different ways that two RR links can be added independently to a parallel 3R-PRR chain to yield an eight-bar slider linkage

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Fig. 9

The desirable and undesirable link pivot regions for a hand exolimb

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Fig. 10

The trajectory of the subject's index finger as obtained from a motion capture system and the synthesized 3R planar chain

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Fig. 11

The image sequence for the selected index and middle finger, reaching the specified task with first and second-order task constraints. Note that the task trajectory has been obtained from a motion capture system data, based on anthropomorphic pen-grasping task.

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Fig. 12

CAD drawing of the resulting wearable device, which consists of one degree-of-freedom eight bar slider index and middle finger exolimb

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Fig. 13

The image sequence of the three-dimensional-printed prototype of the wearable device performing a grasping task

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