0
Research Papers

Task-Based Optimal Design of Metamorphic Service Manipulators

[+] Author and Article Information
Vassilis C. Moulianitis

Department of Product and Systems
Design Engineering,
University of the Aegean,
Ermoupolis 84100, Greece
e-mail: moulianitis@syros.aegean.gr

Aris I. Synodinos

Robotics Group,
Department of Mechanical Engineering
and Aeronautics,
University of Patras,
Patras 26504, Greece
e-mail: asynodin@mech.upatras.gr

Charalampos D. Valsamos

Robotics Group,
Department of Mechanical Engineering
and Aeronautics,
University of Patras,
Patras 26504, Greece
e-mail: balsamos@mech.upatras.gr

Nikos A. Aspragathos

Professor
Robotics Group,
Department of Mechanical Engineering
and Aeronautics,
University of Patras,
Patras 26504, Greece
e-mail: asprag@mech.upatras.gr

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received November 27, 2015; final manuscript received May 5, 2016; published online September 8, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Pierre M. Larochelle.

J. Mechanisms Robotics 8(6), 061011 (Sep 08, 2016) (9 pages) Paper No: JMR-15-1326; doi: 10.1115/1.4033665 History: Received November 27, 2015; Revised May 05, 2016

In this paper, a method for the optimal design of metamorphic manipulators is presented, using path dexterity indices in diverse service tasks. The Swedish massage service is chosen as an application, due the very dissimilar techniques that can be challenging for fixed anatomy manipulators. These techniques are presented and a mapping to dexterity indices is proposed based on each technique's requirements. A method for the evaluation of metamorphic anatomies over tasks is proposed, and the optimized anatomy of a metamorphic manipulator is determined. Finally, an illustrative example is presented for three tasks, where the advantages of the anatomy optimization are demonstrated.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2016 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Koga, H. , Usuda, Y. , Matsuno, M. , Ogura, Y. , Ishii, H. , Solis, J. , Takanishi, A. , and Katsumata, A. , 2007, “ Development of Oral Rehabilitation Robot for Massage Therapy,” 6th International Special Topic Conference on Information Technology Applications in Biomedicine, ITAB 2007, Tokyo, Japan, Nov. 8–11, pp. 111–114.
Kang, C.-G. , ju Lee, B. , xu Son, I. , and Kim, H.-Y. , 2007, “ Design of a Percussive Massage Robot Tapping Human Backs,” 16th IEEE International Symposium on Robot and Human Interactive Communication, RO-MAN 2007, Jeju, Korea, Aug. 26–29, pp. 962–967.
Jones, K. , and Du, W. , 2003, “ Development of a Massage Robot for Medical Therapy,” 2003 IEEE/ASME International Conference on Advanced Intelligent Mechatronics, AIM 2003, July 20–24, Vol. 2, pp. 1096–1101.
Golovin, V. , Arkhipov, M. , and Zhuravlev, V. , 2014, “ Position/Force Control of Medical Robot Interacting With Dynamic Biological Soft Tissue,” Advances on Theory and Practice of Robots and Manipulators (Mechanisms and Machine Science), Vol. 22, M. Ceccarelli , and V. A. Glazunov , eds., Springer International Publishing, Switzerland, pp. 303–310.
Huang, Y. , Li, J. , Huang, Q. , and Souères, P. , 2015, “ Anthropomorphic Robotic Arm With Integrated Elastic Joints for TCM Remedial Massage,” Robotica, 33(2), pp. 348–365. [CrossRef]
Paredis, C. , Brown, B. , and Khosla, P. , 1996, “ A Rapidly Deployable Manipulator System,” IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), Minneapolis, MN, Apr. 22–28, pp. 1434–1439.
Aimedee, F. , Gogu, G. , Dai, J. , Bouzgarrou, C. , and Bouton, N. , 2016, “ Systematization of Morphing in Reconfigurable Mechanisms,” Mech. Mach. Theory, 96(2), pp. 215–224. [CrossRef]
Yun, S.-K. , and Rus, D. , 2011, “ Optimal Self Assembly of Modular Manipulators With Active and Passive Modules,” Auton. Rob., 31(2), pp. 183–207. [CrossRef]
Aghili, F. , and Parsa, K. , 2006, “ Design of a Reconfigurable Space Robot With Lockable Telescopic Joints,” IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS), Beijing, China, Oct. 9–15, pp. 4608–4614.
Liu, G. , He, X. , Yuan, J. , Abdul, S. , and Goldberg, A. , 2008, “ Development of a Modular and Reconfigurable Robot With Multiple Working Modes,” IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), Pasadena, CA, May 19–23, pp. 3502–3507.
Davey, J. , Kwok, N. , and Yim, M. , 2012, “ Emulating Self-Reconfigurable Robots—Design of the Smores System,” IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS), Vilamoura, Algarve, Portugal, Oct. 7–12, pp. 4464–4469.
Valsamos, C. , Moulianitis, V. , and Aspragathos, N. , 2012, “ Index Based Optimal Anatomy of a Metamorphic Manipulator for a Given Task,” Rob. Comput.-Integr. Manuf., 28(4), pp. 517–529. [CrossRef]
Valsamos, C. , Moulianitis, V. , and Aspragathos, N. , 2014, “ Kinematic Synthesis and Evaluation of Structure Topologies for Metamorphic Serial Manipulators,” ASME J. Mech. Rob., 6(4), p. 041005. [CrossRef]
Moulianitis, V. , Aspragathos, N. , and Valsamos, C. , 2015, “ Suboptimal Anatomy of Metamorphic Manipulators Based on the High Rotational Dexterity,” Advances in Reconfigurable Mechanisms and Robots II, Springer, Cham, Switzerland, pp. 509–519.
Angeles, J. , 2002, Fundamentals of Robotic Mechanical Systems, Vol. 2, Springer, Cham, Switzerland.
Benjamin, P. , 1987, “ Notations to the General Principles of Gymnastics by Per Henrik Ling,” J. Am. Massage Ther. Assoc., Winter, pp. 26–38.
Casanelia, L. , and Stelfox, D. , 2009, Foundations of Massage, Elsevier Health Sciences, Chatswood, Australia.
Salvo, S. G. , 2003, Massage Therapy: Principles and Practice, Saunders, St. Louis, MO.
Benjamin, P. , and Tappan, F. , 2009, Tappan's Handbook of Healing Massage Techniques, Pearson, New York.
Yoshikawa, T. , 1985, “ Manipulability of Robotic Mechanisms,” Int. J. Rob. Res., 4(2), pp. 3–9. [CrossRef]
Salisbury, J.-K. , and Craig, J.-J. , 1982, “ Articulated Hands: Force Control and Kinematic Issues,” Int. J. Rob. Res., 1(1), pp. 4–17. [CrossRef]
Nektarios, A. , and Aspragathos, N. A. , 2010, “ Optimal Location of a General Position and Orientation End-Effector's Path Relative to Manipulator's Base, Considering Velocity Performance,” Rob. Comput.-Integr. Manuf., 26(2), pp. 162–173. [CrossRef]
Dubey, R. , and Luh, J. , 1988, “ Redundant Robot Control Using Task Based Performance Measures,” J. Rob. Syst., 5(5), pp. 409–432. [CrossRef]
Synodinos, A. , Moulianitis, V. , and Aspragathos, N. , 2015, “ A Fuzzy Approximation to Dexterity Measures of Mobile Manipulators,” Adv. Rob., 29(12), pp. 753–769. [CrossRef]

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

A metamorphic manipulator comprised of links, pseudojoints, and active (rotational) joints: (a) the 6DoF case study metamorphic manipulator with four pseudojoints, (b) isometric view of a pseudojoint and the corresponding axis of rotation Zp, and (c) isometric view of an active joint and the corresponding axis of rotation Z

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Unit directional vectors along the path

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Mapping of a path in SE(3) to multiple paths in the joint space

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Vertical straight line path of high end-effector force: (a) the rm for two different anatomies (best—left and arbitrary—right) for the lifting task and (b) the required torques for the lifting task (best anatomy—solid and arbitrary anatomy–dashed)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Horizontal circular line path of high end-effector force: (a) the values of rm along the semicircular task for the best anatomy (over the trajectory) and an arbitrary anatomy (under the trajectory) and (b) the required joint torques for the semicircular task (best anatomy—solid and arbitrary anatomy–dashed)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

The values of rv for the best anatomy along the semicircular task for the best anatomy (over the trajectory) and an arbitrary anatomy (under the trajectory)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Horizontal circular line path of high end-effector velocity: (a) the required velocities for the first and second joints of the semicircular task (best anatomy—solid and arbitrary anatomy—dashed) and (b) the required velocities for the second and third joints of the semicircular task (best anatomy—solid and arbitrary anatomy—dashed)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

The best anatomies in their reference configuration for all three tasks described: (a) for the scenario in Sec. 6.1, (b) for the scenario in Sec. 6.2, and (c) for the scenario in Sec. 6.3

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In