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Research Papers

Dynamic Reconfiguration Manipulability for Redundant Manipulators

[+] Author and Article Information
Mamoru Minami

Professor
Graduate School of Natural
Science and Technology,
Okayama University,
Okayama,
Okayama 700-8530, Japan
e-mail: minami-m@cc.okayama-u.ac.jp

Xiang Li

Graduate School of Natural
Science and Technology,
Okayama University,
Okayama,
Okayama 700-8530, Japan

Takayuki Matsuno

Graduate School of Natural
Science and Technology,
Okayama University,
Okayama,
Okayama 700-8530, Japan
e-mail: matsuno@cc.okayama-u.ac.jp

Akira Yanou

Associate Professor
Department of Radiological Technology,
Kawasaki College of Allied
Health Professions,
Kurashiki,
Okayama 701-0194, Japan
e-mail: yanou-a@mw.kawasaki-m.ac.jp

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received July 30, 2015; final manuscript received May 6, 2016; published online September 6, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Leila Notash.

J. Mechanisms Robotics 8(6), 061004 (Sep 06, 2016) (9 pages) Paper No: JMR-15-1211; doi: 10.1115/1.4033667 History: Received July 30, 2015; Revised May 06, 2016

This paper analyzes the dynamics of robotic manipulator based on a concept called dynamic reconfiguration manipulability (DRM), which gauges the dynamical shape-changeability of a robot based on the redundancy of the robot and the premise that the primary task is the hand task. DRM represents how much acceleration each intermediate link can generate and in what direction the acceleration can be realized based on normalized torque inputs. This concept will aid in the optimization of the design and control of robots. The appropriateness and usefulness of DRM were confirmed by applying it to redundant manipulators and comparing it with the known concept of avoidance manipulability.

Copyright © 2016 by ASME
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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

(a) DMEs represent the possible accelerations of all the links with no prioritized task. (b) DRMEs represent the possible accelerations of intermediate links while the system is executing the primary task.

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Fig. 2

Reconfiguration at intermediate link while executing hand task

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Fig. 3

Four-link manipulator

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Fig. 4

Configuration of manipulator

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Fig. 5

Results of the simulation when the random values of ||1l||≤1 are input with the prioritized task r¨nd=[0,0]T:(a) Δ1r¨2 and (b)  1r¨2

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Fig. 6

Results of the simulation when the random values of ||1l||≤1 are input with the prioritized task r¨nd=[1,0]T:(a) Δ1r¨2 and (b)  1r¨2

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Fig. 7

Maps of (a) DRMM and (b) RMM for four-link manipulator

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Fig. 8

(a) Vertical acceleration derived from the DRME. (b) Vertical velocity derived from the RME. (a) DRMM and (b) RMM.

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Fig. 9

Vertical acceleration and vertical velocity plotted against q2 with q4 = 130 deg: (a) vertical acceleration derived from the DRME and (b) vertical velocity derived from the RME

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Fig. 10

DRME and RME for various configurations obtained by varying q2 from 30 deg to 170 deg: (a) DRME and (b) RME

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Fig. 11

Desired trajectory of hand and tip of second link

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Fig. 12

Performance of hand acceleration

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Fig. 13

Performance of hand velocity and position

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Fig. 14

Performance of acceleration of second link

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Fig. 15

Performance of velocity and position of second link

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Fig. 16

Humanoid robot walking on uneven ground. (a) Nonsingular configuration: redundant ability to accelerate the waist position while maintaining head height and placing the foot on the uneven ground. (b) Partially singular configuration (from waist to head): cannot afford to maintain the current head height while placing the foot on the ground. This inability is demonstrated by the DRME of waist having narrow width.

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