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Research Papers

Static Analysis of an Inverted Planetary Roller Screw Mechanism

[+] Author and Article Information
Folly Abevi

SKF Transrol,
148 Rue Felix Esclangon,
Chambéry 73000, France
e-mail: folly.abevi@skf.com

Alain Daidie

Institut Clément ADER,
INSA (Institut National des Sciences Appliquées),
Université de Toulouse,
3 Rue Caroline Aigle,
Toulouse 31400, France
e-mail: alain.daidie@insa-toulouse.fr

Michel Chaussumier

Institut Clément ADER,
INSA (Institut National des Sciences Appliquées),
Université de Toulouse,
3 Rue Caroline Aigle,
Toulouse 31400, France
e-mail: michel.chaussumier@insa-toulouse.fr

Stéphane Orieux

Institut Clément ADER,
INSA (Institut National des Sciences Appliquées),
3 Rue Caroline Aigle,
Toulouse 31400, France
e-mail: stephane.orieux@insa-toulouse.fr

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received November 28, 2015; final manuscript received March 16, 2016; published online April 19, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Raffaele Di Gregorio.

J. Mechanisms Robotics 8(4), 041020 (Apr 19, 2016) (14 pages) Paper No: JMR-15-1327; doi: 10.1115/1.4033159 History: Received November 28, 2015; Revised March 16, 2016

The paper examines the static behavior of the inverted planetary roller screw (PRS) through numerical and experimental studies. The numerical analysis of the inverted PRS is first presented to capture the global and local deformations in different configurations. Using a three-dimensional finite element (3D FE) method, a sectorial model of the mechanism is built involving an entire roller. The model describes the static behavior of the system under a heavy load and shows the state of the contacts and the in-depth stress zones. The current work also investigates the axial stiffness (AS) and the load distribution (LD) under both compressive and tensile loadings. It is shown that the LDs are not the same at each contact interface of the roller and that they depend on the configuration of the system. Also, the nut is less stressed than the screw shaft because of their contact curvatures. In parallel, complementary experiments are carried out to measure the axial deflection of the screw shaft and the rollers in five cases with different numbers of rollers. In each situation, the mechanism is under the same equivalent axial and static load. The tests reveal that rollers do not have the same behavior, the difference certainly being due to manufacturing and positioning errors that directly affect the number of effective contacts in the device. This stresses the fact that the external load is unequally shared over rollers and contacting threads. By introducing the notion of an equivalent roller, the results are used to validate the previous numerical model of an inverted PRS. As they provide a better understanding of the inverted PRS, these investigations are useful to improve the existing analytical models of the device.

Copyright © 2016 by ASME
Topics: Screws , Stress , Rollers , Thread
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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Overview of the inverted PRS inside the COVADIS electromechanic actuator [35]

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Fig. 2

Simplified inverted PRS (a) and sectoral model scheme (b)

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Fig. 3

Inverted PRS with screw shaft at its initial position (CONFIG 1)

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Fig. 4

Inverted PRS with screw shaft at midstroke (CONFIG 2)

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Fig. 5

Inverted PRS with screw shaft at its final position (CONFIG 3)

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Fig. 6

Results related to the sectorial model of the inverted PRS with 11 rollers in the TC

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Fig. 7

Behavior of the nonflexible roller (a) and the bending flexible roller (b) in TC

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Fig. 8

Behavior of the nonflexible roller (a) and the bending flexible roller (b) in CC

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Fig. 9

Contact zones of the first two threads of the roller at screw–roller (a) and nut–roller (b) interfaces

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Fig. 10

LD at the screw–roller interface in TC for nonflexible (a) and flexible (b) rollers

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Fig. 11

LD at the screw–roller interface in CC for nonflexible (a) and flexible (b) rollers

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Fig. 12

LD at the nut–roller interface in TC for nonflexible (a) and flexible (b) rollers

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Fig. 13

LD at the nut–roller interface in CC for nonflexible (a) and flexible (b) rollers

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Fig. 14

Load–displacement curves of the screw shaft for (a) a nonflexible roller and (b) a flexible roller

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Fig. 15

Load–displacement curves of the nut for (a) a nonflexible roller and (b) a flexible roller

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Fig. 16

Load–displacement curves related to (a) a nonflexible roller and (b) a flexible roller

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Fig. 17

Axial section of the nut in TC with the migration of the contact zone

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Fig. 18

Axial section of the nut in CC with the migration of the contact zone

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Fig. 19

CAD model of (a) the test bench and (b) zoom on the clamping system

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Fig. 20

AS test bench (a) global view and (b) zoom on the clamping system

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Fig. 21

AS curves of (a) the screw and (b) the 11 rollers (Test_R11)

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Fig. 22

AS curves of (a) the screw and (b) the ten rollers (Test_R10)

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Fig. 23

AS curves of (a) the screw and (b) the eight rollers (Test_R8)

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Fig. 24

AS curves of (a) the screw and (b) the six rollers (Test_R6)

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Fig. 25

AS curves of (a) the screw and (b) the five rollers (Test_R5)

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Fig. 26

Comparison of ASes of (a) the inverted PRS and (b) the equivalent roller in CONFIG 1

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