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Research Papers

A Skeletal Prototype of Surgical Arm Based on Dual-Triangular Mechanism

[+] Author and Article Information
Shao T. Liu

Laboratory of Motion Generation and Analysis,
Department of Mechanical and
Aerospace Engineering,
Monash University,
Victoria 3800, Australia
e-mail: shao.liu@monash.edu

Laurence Harewood

Epworth Freemansons Medical Center,
East Melbourne, Victoria 3002, Australia
e-mail: laurenceharewood@urologyvictoria.com

Bernard Chen

Department of Mechanical and
Aerospace Engineering,
Monash University,
Victoria 3800, Australia
e-mail: bernard.chen@monash.edu

Chao Chen

Laboratory of Motion Generation and Analysis,
Department of Mechanical and
Aerospace Engineering,
Monash University,
Victoria 3800, Australia
e-mail: chao.chen@monash.edu

Manuscript received September 21, 2015; final manuscript received March 3, 2016; published online March 29, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Byung-Ju Yi.

J. Mechanisms Robotics 8(4), 041015 (Mar 29, 2016) (7 pages) Paper No: JMR-15-1277; doi: 10.1115/1.4032976 History: Received September 21, 2015; Revised March 03, 2016

The parallelogram-based remote center of motion (RCM) mechanism used for robotic minimally invasive surgery (MIS) manipulators generates a relatively large device footprint. The consequence being larger chance of interference between the robotic arms and restricted workspace, hence obstruct optimal surgical functioning. A novel mechanism with RCM, dual-triangular linkage (DT-linkage), is introduced to reduce the occupied space by the linkage while keeping sufficient space around the incision. Hence, the chance of collisions among arms and tools can be reduced. The concept of this dual-triangular linkage is proven mathematically and validated by a prototype. Auxiliary mechanisms are introduced to remove the singularity at the fully folded configuration. The characterized footprints of this new linkage and the one based on parallelograms are analyzed and compared.

Copyright © 2016 by ASME
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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Conceptual design using the DT-linkage

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Fig. 2

The planar Kempe linkage in its general form

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Fig. 3

Configuration of auxiliary parallelograms

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Fig. 4

Configuration of auxiliary mechanism for four-bar linkage—right view

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Fig. 5

Configuration of auxiliary mechanism for four-bar linkage—left view

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Fig. 6

Planar RCM mechanisms at midposition of ROM: (a) DT-linkage and (b) PB-linkage

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Fig. 7

Planar RCM mechanisms at right boundary of ROM: (a) DT-linkage and (b) PB-linkage

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Fig. 8

Planar RCM mechanisms at left boundary of ROM: (a) DT-linkage and (b) PB-linkage

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Fig. 9

Average footprints of RCM mechanisms: (a) DT-linkage and (b) PB-linkage

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Fig. 10

Difference in characteristic areas of the RCM mechanisms

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Fig. 11

Percentage difference in characteristic areas of the RCM mechanisms—DT-linkage supremacy region

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Fig. 12

Skeletal prototype of two-DOF surgical arm

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Fig. 13

Input–output plot of the DT-linkage

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Fig. 14

CAD model of the two-DOF RCM mechanism

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Fig. 15

Different configurations of the two-DOF RCM mechanism

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Fig. 16

The experimental setup

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Fig. 17

RC position error of DT-linkage

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