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Technical Brief

A Model-Based Two-Arm Robot With Dynamic Vertical and Lateral Climbing Behaviors

[+] Author and Article Information
Wei-Hung Ko

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
National Taiwan University,
Taipei 106, Taiwan
e-mail: b99502083@ntu.edu.tw

Wei-Hsuan Chiang

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
National Taiwan University,
Taipei 106, Taiwan
e-mail: b99502085@ntu.edu.tw

Ya-Han Hsu

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
National Taiwan University,
Taipei 106, Taiwan
e-mail: b99502115@ntu.edu.tw

Ming-Yuan Yu

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
National Taiwan University,
Taipei 106, Taiwan
e-mail: b98502039@ntu.edu.tw

Hung-Sheng Lin

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
National Taiwan University,
Taipei 106, Taiwan
e-mail: r02522813@ntu.edu.tw

Pei-Chun Lin

Mem. ASME
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
National Taiwan University,
Taipei 106, Taiwan
e-mail: peichunlin@ntu.edu.tw

1W.-H. Ko and W.-H. Chiang contributed equally to this work.

2Corresponding author.

Manuscript received April 15, 2015; final manuscript received February 5, 2016; published online March 10, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Xilun Ding.

J. Mechanisms Robotics 8(4), 044503 (Mar 10, 2016) (9 pages) Paper No: JMR-15-1092; doi: 10.1115/1.4032777 History: Received April 15, 2015; Revised February 05, 2016

We report on the model-based development of a climbing robot that is capable of performing dynamic vertical and lateral climbing motions. The robot was designed based on the two-arm vertical-climbing model inspired by the dynamic climbing motion of cockroaches and geckos, with the extension of introducing the arm sprawl motion to initiate the lateral climbing motion. The quantitative formulation of the model was derived based on Lagrangian mechanics, and the numerical analysis of the model was conducted. The robot was then built and controlled based on the analysis results of the model. The robot can perform the behaviors predicted by the model in which the climbing speed decreases when the swing magnitude increases, and the lateral climbing motion can be initiated when the arm sprawl motion is introduced. The experimental validation of the robot confirms that though the reduced-order two-arm model is abstract and ignored various empirical details, the model is sufficient to predict the robot behavior. This conclusion further suggests that the behavior development of the robot can indeed be explored and evaluated by using the simple climbing model in the simulation environment in place of extensive trial-and-error on the physical robot.

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Copyright © 2016 by ASME
Topics: Robots
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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

The sketch and notations of the two-arm model (a) and the physical robot (b)

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Fig. 6

The detailed CAD drawings of the robot arm (a) and the claw (c), and (b) the CAD drawing of the passive claw utilized in Ref. [9]

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Fig. 5

The COM velocity of the model with different resistant forces (F&C), periods (tp), swing amplitudes (Am), and offset angles (Om)

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Fig. 4

The dynamic behavior of the model with different body orientations

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Fig. 3

The climbing speed (v) of the model versus the resultant Coulomb friction force (F) and the damping coefficient (C)shown in a 3D view in (a), a side view in (b), and a front view in (c)

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Fig. 7

The photo of the robot

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Fig. 8

The COM trajectories of the two-arm model (a) and the robot (b) with three different offset angles (Om)

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Fig. 9

The COM trajectories of the two-arm model (a) and the robot (b) with three different actuation periods (tp)

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Fig. 10

The COM trajectories of the two-arm model (a) and the robot (b) with three different combinations of the offset angles (Om) and the swing amplitudes (Am)

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Fig. 2

The motion sequence of the model in vertical climbing (a) and lateral climbing (b) simulated using MATLAB®

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