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Research Papers

Novel Deployable Mechanisms With Decoupled Degrees-of-Freedom

[+] Author and Article Information
Shengnan Lu

Robotics Institute,
Beihang University,
Beijing 100191, China;
PMAR Robotics,
University of Genoa,
Genoa 16145, Italy
e-mail: lvshengnan5@gmail.com

Dimiter Zlatanov

PMAR Robotics,
University of Genoa,
Genoa 16145, Italy
e-mail: zlatanov@dimec.unige.it

Xilun Ding

Robotics Institute,
Beihang University,
Beijing 100191, China
e-mail: xlding@buaa.edu.cn

Rezia Molfino

PMAR Robotics,
University of Genoa,
Genoa 16145, Italy
e-mail: molfino@dimec.unige.it

Matteo Zoppi

PMAR Robotics,
University of Genoa,
Genoa 16145, Italy
e-mail: Zoppi@dimec.unige.it

Manuscript received February 2, 2015; final manuscript received September 8, 2015; published online November 24, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Andrew P. Murray.

J. Mechanisms Robotics 8(2), 021008 (Nov 24, 2015) (9 pages) Paper No: JMR-15-1022; doi: 10.1115/1.4031639 History: Received February 02, 2015; Revised September 08, 2015; Accepted September 18, 2015

A novel family of deployable mechanisms (DMs) is presented. Unlike most such devices, which have one degree-of-freedom (DOF), the proposed DM can be deployed and compacted independently in two or three directions. This widens the range of its potential applications, including flexible industrial fixtures and deployable tents. The mechanism's basic deployable unit (DU) is assembled by combining a scissor linkage and a Sarrus linkage. The kinematic properties of these two components and of the combined unit are analyzed. The conditions under which the unit can be maximally compacted and deployed are determined through singularity analysis. New 2DOF DMs are obtained by linking the DUs: each mechanism's shape can be modified in two directions. The relationship between the degree of overconstraint and the number of DUs is derived. The magnification ratio is calculated as a function of link thickness and the number of DUs. The idea of deployment in independent directions is then extended to three dimensions with a family of 3DOF mechanisms. Finally, kinematic simulations are performed to validate the proposed designs and analyses.

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References

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Figures

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Fig. 1

A scissor linkage assembly

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Fig. 2

Another scissor linkage assembly

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Fig. 3

The Sarrus linkage

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Fig. 4

The adopted Sarrus linkage

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Fig. 5

A DU combining scissor and Sarrus linkages

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Fig. 6

CAD model of the DU

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Fig. 7

A slider–rocker mechanism

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Fig. 8

Configuration space of the slider–rocker mechanism

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Fig. 9

The three types of c-spaces for a collapsable Sarrus leg

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Fig. 10

A collapsible Sarrus with nonzero offsets (a) and top view (b)

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Fig. 11

Equal-bar slider–crank mechanism

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Fig. 12

CAD model of a DU (a) and top view (b)

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Fig. 13

Assembly process of the 2DOF DM

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Fig. 15

A DM with four units (a) and top view (b)

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Fig. 16

Simplified 2DOF DM with internal grid: (a) q = 1, p = 2 and (b) q = 2, p = 2

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Fig. 17

Simplified 2DOF DM without internal grid: (a) q = 1, p = 2 and (b) q = 2, p = 2

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Fig. 19

The circumscribed box of the DM

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Fig. 20

The magnification ratio r2 as a function of the number of units q and p

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Fig. 21

CAD model of the 3DOF DU

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Fig. 22

Assembly of 3DOF DM

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Fig. 23

Mechanism assembly with eight DUs

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Fig. 24

Mechanism assembly with 18 DUs

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Fig. 25

A 3DOF DM contains eight 3D units

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