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Research Papers

Development of a Manufacturing Method for Truss Core Panels Based on Origami-Forming

[+] Author and Article Information
Hoan Thai Tat Nguyen

School of Mechanical Engineering,
Hanoi University of Science and Technology,
1 Dai Co Viet Road,
Hanoi 100000, Vietnam
e-mail: hoan.ngtt@gmail.com

Phuong Thao Thai

Graduate School of Advanced
Mathematical Sciences,
Meiji University,
4-21-1, Nakano,
Tokyo 1648525, Japan
e-mail: thaithao@meiji.ac.jp

Bo Yu

Meiji Institute for Advanced Study
of Mathematical Sciences,
Meiji University,
4-21-1, Nakano,
Tokyo 1648525, Japan
e-mail: yubo1983@gmail.com

Ichiro Hagiwara

Meiji Institute for Advanced Study
of Mathematical Sciences,
Meiji University,
4-21-1, Nakano,
Tokyo 1648525, Japan
e-mail: ihagi@meiji.ac.jp

Manuscript received July 1, 2015; final manuscript received November 25, 2015; published online March 7, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Larry L. Howell.

J. Mechanisms Robotics 8(3), 031011 (Mar 07, 2016) (8 pages) Paper No: JMR-15-1177; doi: 10.1115/1.4032208 History: Received July 01, 2015; Revised November 25, 2015

Sandwich panels, for example, honeycomb structure, are widely used in various stages because they are lightweight and have high stiffness. Recently, an origami structure called truss core panel (TCP) has become known as a lightweight structure that has the same bending stiffness and better aspects in shear strength and in-plane compressive load than honeycomb panel. However, there are some difficulties in forming the TCP in general. In this study, a new forming process for TCP based on origami-forming is developed. In particular, the TCP is partitioned into several parts that can be developed into 2D crease patterns. After that, blanks of material are cut in the shape of these crease patterns and are formed by a robot system to get the desired 3D shape. In this paper, a partition method by dividing the TCP into pyramid cells and sheet plate is presented, which allows for the manufacture of a wider range of structure than before. Tool arrangement for a robot device and a countermeasure for springback are considered. By applying an origami unfolding technique, an improvement in the partition method is proposed by dividing the TCP into cell rows, and then searching for a crease pattern in order to fold that cell row. The cutting method of every cell is modified to reduce the number of facets, thereby simplifying the process. Finally, a crease pattern based on this new cutting method is presented for producing cell rows with any given number of cells.

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References

Noor, A. K. , Burton, W. S. , and Bert, C. W. , 1996, “ Computational Models for Sandwich Panels and Shells,” ASME Appl. Mech. Rev., 49(3), pp. 155–199. [CrossRef]
Ju, J. , Summers, J. D. , Ziegert, J. , and Fadel, G. , 2012, “ Design of Honeycombs for Modulus and Yield Strain in Shear,” ASME J. Eng. Mater. Technol., 134(1), p. 011002. [CrossRef]
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Tokura, S. , and Hagiwara, I. , 2010, “ A Study for the Influence of Work Hardening on Bending Stiffness of Truss Core Panel,” ASME J. Appl. Mech., 77(3), p. 031010. [CrossRef]
Tokura, S. , and Hagiwara, I. , 2008, “ Forming Process Simulation of Truss Core Panel,” Trans. Jpn. Soc. Mech. Eng., Ser. A, 74(746), pp. 1379–1385. [CrossRef]
Hagiwara, I. , 2011, “ Welding by Pressing 2 Sheets of Cheaper Steel Panel Than Honey Comb,” Automotive Technology, Nikkei, Tokyo, pp. 96–101.
Saito, K. , and Nojima, T. , 2007, “ Modeling of New Light-Weight, Rigid Core Panels Based on Geometric Plane Tilings and Space Fillings,” Trans. Jpn. Soc. Mech. Eng., Ser. A, 73(735), pp. 1302–1308. [CrossRef]
Tuda, M. , and Hagiwara, I. , 1998, “ Dynamic-Explicit Finite Element Analysis Methods for Large-Deformation Quasi-Static Problems (1st Report, Presentation of Research Theme),” J. Jpn. Soc. Mech. Eng., 64(622), pp. 1548–1555. [CrossRef]
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Figures

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Fig. 1

A new manufacturing method called origami-forming

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Fig. 2

Partition strategy I

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Fig. 3

Deployment from 3D cell to 2D sheet

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Fig. 4

Bending tools: ①, ③: Vertical punches; ②: upper plunger; ④, ⑨: horizontal punches; ⑤, ⑧: side plungers; ⑥: die; and ⑦: center plunger

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Fig. 8

Finite-element analysis model of the blank

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Fig. 9

Finite-element analysis model of the tool: ①–1, ①–2, ②, ③–1, ③–2: vertical punches; ④: horizontal punches; ⑤, ⑧: side plungers; ⑥: die; and ⑦: center plunger

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Fig. 10

Tools arrangement of type A

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Fig. 11

Tools arrangement of type B

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Fig. 12

The angle ϕ between two bottom lines of the edge

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Fig. 13

Gap 1 in case of two types (a) type A and (b) type B

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Fig. 14

Von-Mises stress distribution of the blank at step 2 of forming process (a) type A and (b) type B

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Fig. 15

The evaluation of the blank

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Fig. 16

Von-Mises stress distribution of the blank right after bending process

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Fig. 17

Comparison of the magnitude of the blank

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Fig. 18

New method of cutting pyramid cell

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Fig. 19

Partition strategy II

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Fig. 20

New deployment from 3D cell to 2D sheet for cell row (a) cores row (top view), (b) deployment of facet 1, 2, and 3 (3D view), and (c) 2D crease pattern (top view)

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Fig. 21

Comparison of cutting method between two strategies (a) TCP with 18 cores (3D view), (b) cutting method of strategy-I (top view), and (c) cutting method of strategy-II (top view)

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Fig. 22

Forming a new cell from facet 5, 6, and 7

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Fig. 23

Bending tools in new cutting method: ①, ⑤, ⑥, ⑦: Vertical punches; ②, ⑨: horizontal punches; ③, ⑧: side plungers; and ④: die

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Fig. 24

Comparison of the error Eθ in case tR=0.00 mm and tR=0.03 mm

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