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Design Innovation Paper

Ground Mobile Schatz Mechanism

[+] Author and Article Information
Chao Liu

State Key Laboratory of Mechanical System and Vibration,
Shanghai Jiao Tong University,
Shanghai 200240, China;
Shanghai Key Laboratory of Digital Manufacture
for Thin-Walled Structures,
Shanghai Jiao Tong University,
Shanghai 200240, China;
School of Mechanical, Electronic and Control Engineering,
Beijing Jiaotong University,
Beijing 100044, China

Shun Yao

School of Mechanical, Electronic and Control Engineering,
Beijing Jiaotong University,
Beijing 100044, China

Hao Wang

State Key Laboratory of Mechanical System and Vibration,
Shanghai Jiao Tong University,
Shanghai 200240, China;
Shanghai Key Laboratory of Digital Manufacture
for Thin-Walled Structures,
Shanghai Jiao Tong University,
Shanghai 200240, China
e-mail: wanghao@sjtu.edu.cn

Yan-An Yao

School of Mechanical, Electronic and Control Engineering,
Beijing Jiaotong University,
Beijing 100044, China
e-mail: yayao@bjtu.edu.cn

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received December 9, 2014; final manuscript received April 26, 2015; published online August 18, 2015. Assoc. Editor: David Dooner.

J. Mechanisms Robotics 8(1), 015002 (Aug 18, 2015) (15 pages) Paper No: JMR-14-1342; doi: 10.1115/1.4030503 History: Received December 09, 2014

We put forward a novel proposition that a mechanism can move in a constant direction and change its moving directions only by one actuator and construct a single-DOF (degree of freedom) ground mobile mechanism based on the well-known Schatz mechanism. This ground mobile Schatz mechanism has six links, one of which is designed as a spoke octahedron and an other one as a tail link. When the actuator rotates in one direction, the spoke octahedron can roll on the ground to let the ground mobile Schatz mechanism to move in a straight line pushed by the tail link. When the actuator rotates in the opposite direction, the tail link can be lifted to change its landing point and the relative position between it and the spoke octahedron, then the spoke octahedron can roll in another direction pushed by the tail link. In addition, it is also an untraditional application of the Schatz mechanism that it is used as a novel ground mobile mechanism. Locomotion analysis, gait planning and stability analysis are performed, respectively, and a prototype is developed and tested.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

The ground mobile Schatz mechanism

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Fig. 2

The landing parts of the ground mobile Schatz mechanism

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Fig. 3

The crawling locomotion

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Fig. 4

The swing trajectory of the tail link

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Fig. 5

The swing trajectory of the Lu

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Fig. 6

The turning gait of the case I

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Fig. 7

The turning gait of the case II

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Fig. 8

The detail description of the spoke octahedron

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Fig. 10

The crawling path in one crawling period

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Fig. 11

Turning directions in one crawling period

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Fig. 13

The foot workspace of the ground mobile Schatz mechanism

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Fig. 14

The turning motion of the ground mobile Schatz mechanism in case I

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Fig. 15

The support polygon in case I

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Fig. 16

The input angle value

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Fig. 17

The input angular velocity

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Fig. 18

The input angular acceleration

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Fig. 19

The ZMP trajectory in case I

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Fig. 20

Prototype of the ground mobile Schatz mechanism

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Fig. 21

The design of the links of the prototype

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Fig. 22

The design of the landing points of the prototype

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Fig. 23

Crawling along a straight line of the prototype

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Fig. 24

Turning in case I of the prototype

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Fig. 25

Turning in case II of the prototype

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Fig. 26

The crawling experiment in the turning motion of case I

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Fig. 27

The crawling experiment in the turning motion of case II

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