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Research Papers

Motion Generation of Planar Six- and Eight-Bar Slider Mechanisms as Constrained Robotic Systems

[+] Author and Article Information
Gim Song Soh

Engineering Product Development,
Singapore University of Technology and Design,
Singapore 487372, Singapore
e-mail: sohgimsong@sutd.edu.sg

Fangtian Ying

International Design Institute,
Zhejiang University,
Hangzhou 310058, Zhejiang Province, China
e-mail: yingft@gmail.com

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received June 19, 2014; final manuscript received January 30, 2015; published online May 12, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Philippe Wenger.

J. Mechanisms Robotics 7(3), 031018 (Aug 01, 2015) (8 pages) Paper No: JMR-14-1142; doi: 10.1115/1.4029833 History: Received June 19, 2014; Revised January 30, 2015; Online May 12, 2015

In this paper, we formulated a systematic design methodology for the design of planar six- and eight-bar slider mechanisms for motion generation applications that require more complex motion than the slider–crank mechanism. We show how two RR dyads can be synthesized and attached to planar PRR and PRR–3R chain for the dimensional synthesis of planar six- and eight-bar slider mechanisms, respectively. The results are 15 different types of one degree-of-freedom planar six- and eight-bar linkages with a prismatic joint at its base. We demonstrate the design process with the design of a multifunctional wheelchair that could transform its structure between a self-propelled wheelchair and a walking guide meant for outpatient rehabilitation purpose.

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References

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Figures

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Fig. 1

The kinematic inversions of a four-bar chain with three pin joints and a prismatic joint

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Fig. 2

Planar six-bar with a coupler moving through a sequence of five tasks positions

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Fig. 3

The fixed and moving frame defining a planar displacement

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Fig. 4

RR dyad that connects with two moving bodies

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Fig. 5

Six-bar slider mechanisms derived from Watt's and Stephenson chains: (a) Watt I, (b) Watt II, (c) Stephenson I, (d) Stephenson II, (e) Stephenson III

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Fig. 6

The kinematic diagram of a planar PRR chain. The graph of this chain has a vertex for each link and an edge for each joint. R denotes a revolute joint and P a prismatic joint.

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Fig. 7

The linkage graphs show the synthesis sequence of the three constrained PRR chains in which the two RR chains are attached independently

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Fig. 8

The linkage graphs show the synthesis sequence of the four constrained PRR chains in which the second RR chain connects to the first RR chain

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Fig. 9

The 16 one degree-of-freedom topologies for planar eight-bar chains

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Fig. 10

The kinematic diagram of the planar PRR–3R parallel robot. The graph of this chain has a vertex for each link and an edge for each joint. R denotes a revolute joint and P a prismatic joint.

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Fig. 11

The linkage graphs show the synthesis sequence of the four planar eight-bar linkages in which the two RR chains are attached independently. The number in brackets denotes its topological chain. The graph edges denote a revolute joint unless otherwise stated.

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Fig. 12

The linkage graphs show the synthesis sequence of the four planar eight-bar linkages in which the second RR chain connects to the first RR chain. The number in brackets denotes its topological chain. The graph edges denote a revolute joint unless otherwise stated.

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Fig. 13

The five task positions for the multifunctional wheelchair

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Fig. 14

The image sequence for the B24B24 planar eight-bar linkage reaching a set of five task positions

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Fig. 15

The 14-bar transformative system formed by the eight-bar slider mechanism connected through the seat of the wheelchair

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Fig. 16

A mobility device that transforms between a wheelchair and a walking guide

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