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Research Papers

Evaluating Compliant Hinge Geometries for Origami-Inspired Mechanisms

[+] Author and Article Information
Isaac L. Delimont

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Brigham Young University,
Provo, UT 84602
e-mail: isaacdelimont@gmail.com

Spencer P. Magleby

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Brigham Young University,
Provo, UT 84602
e-mail: magleby@byu.edu

Larry L. Howell

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Brigham Young University,
Provo, UT 84602
e-mail: lhowell@byu.edu

Manuscript received September 26, 2014; final manuscript received December 2, 2014; published online December 31, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Carl Nelson.

J. Mechanisms Robotics 7(1), 011009 (Feb 01, 2015) (8 pages) Paper No: JMR-14-1263; doi: 10.1115/1.4029325 History: Received September 26, 2014; Revised December 02, 2014; Online December 31, 2014

Origami-inspired design is an emerging field capable of producing compact and efficient designs. Compliant hinges are proposed as a way to replicate the folding motion of paper when using nonpaper materials. Compliant hinges function as surrogate folds and can be defined as localized reduction of stiffness. The purpose of this paper is to organize and evaluate selected surrogate folds for use in compliant mechanisms. These surrogate folds are characterized based on the desired motion as well as motions typically considered parasitic. Additionally, the surrogate folds' ability to rotate through large deflections and their stability of center of rotation are evaluated. Existing surrogate folds are reviewed and closed-form solutions presented. A diagram intended as a straightforward design guide is presented. Areas for potential development in the surrogate fold design space are noted.

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References

Demaine, E., 2001, “Folding and Unfolding Linkages, Paper, and Polyhedra,” Discrete and Computational Geometry (Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Vol. 2098), J.Akiyama, M.Kano, and M.Urabe, eds., Springer, Berlin, pp. 113–124.
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Klett, Y., and Drechsler, K., 2010, “Designing Technical Tessellations,” 5th International Meeting of Origami Science, Mathematics, and Education (5OSME), Singapore, July 13–17, pp. 305–322.
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Wu, W., and You, Z., 2010, “Modeling Rigid Origami With Quaternions and Dual Quaternions,” Proc. R. Soc., 466(2119), pp. 2155–2174. [CrossRef]
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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Six possible motions of surrogate folds to be compared for each joint. (a) Folding, (b) torsion, (c) lateral bending, (d) shear, (e) compression, and (f) tension.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Guide for the selection of surrogate folds. All surrogate folds presented are flexible in folding. If another motion is desired, it is selected from the second column.

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Fig. 3

Groove joint with critical parameters labeled

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Fig. 4

Simple reduced-area joint with critical parameters labeled

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Fig. 5

Outside LET joint with critical parameters and fold axis indicated. The torsion bars (with stiffness KT) are oriented parallel to the fold axis while the bending bars (with stiffness KB) are oriented perpendicular to the fold axis.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Equivalent spring diagram for outside LET in folding. KB and KT are torsional spring constants shown as linear for ease of visualization representing the members undergoing bending and torsion, respectively.

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Fig. 7

Spring diagram for outside LET in tension and compression. Each torsional spring has a stiffness of Kfg as defined by Eq. (13).

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Fig. 8

Inside LET with critical parameters labeled

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Fig. 9

Spring diagram for inside LET in folding

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Fig. 10

I-LEJ with critical parameters labeled

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Fig. 11

T-LEJ with critical parameters labeled

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Fig. 12

Schematic of RUFF with critical parameters labeled

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Fig. 13

Torsional U-form flexure

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