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Research Papers

A New Class of Adaptive Parallel Robots

[+] Author and Article Information
Gianmarc Coppola

Robotics and Automation Laboratory,
University of Ontario Institute of Technology,
Oshawa, ON L1H 7K4, Canada
e-mail: gianmarc.coppola@uoit.ca

Dan Zhang

Robotics and Automation Laboratory,
University of Ontario Institute of Technology,
Oshawa, ON L1H 7K4, Canada
e-mail: dan.zhang@uoit.ca

Kefu Liu

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Lakehead University,
Thunder Bay, ON P7B 5E1, Canada
e-mail: kefu.liu@lakeheadu.ca

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Mechanisms and Robotics Committee of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF MECHANISMS AND ROBOTICS. Manuscript received July 19, 2013; final manuscript received May 13, 2014; published online July 2, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Xilun Ding.

J. Mechanisms Robotics 6(4), 041013 (Jul 02, 2014) (11 pages) Paper No: JMR-13-1134; doi: 10.1115/1.4027875 History: Received July 19, 2013; Revised May 13, 2014

In this manuscript, a novel class of parallel manipulators for flexible manufacturing is described. A parallel manipulator that is part of this class is proposed and studied. The proposed manipulator possesses machine flexibility such that it can adapt its properties to a multitude of future and unknown functional requirements. Notably, a combination of redundancy and a hybrid topology is utilized in this class. A systematic analysis is conducted that involves mobility, kinematics, instantaneous kinematics, Jacobian formulation, workspace, traditional and conservative stiffness mapping as well as optimal force distribution. These properties are discussed as their relation to flexibility. The proposed manipulator is also compared to the Stewart platform in force distribution circumstances. It is illustrated that the proposed robotic system is able to adapt and change its properties by changing its motion manifold or internal preloads actively.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Prototype of the HAPM (conceptual model)

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Fig. 2

CAD render of the HAPM

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Fig. 3

Vector and geometric diagram for 3 limbs, i = 1,2,3

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Fig. 4

Vector diagram for the 4th limb

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Fig. 5

Constant orientation workspace

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Fig. 6

X-direction stiffness variation with motion manifold, solid: θ and dashed: lr (Px = −0.045, Py = 0.03, Pz = 0.065)

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Fig. 7

Static traditional stiffness (N/m), manifold (θ,lr) = (135, variable)

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Fig. 8

Static traditional stiffness (N/m), manifold (θ,lr) = (270, variable)

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Fig. 9

Conservative stiffness (N/m), manifold (θ,lr) = (135,variable), υ=190

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Fig. 10

Typical objective function convergence, sequential simplex

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Fig. 11

Graphical comparison of optimal results (labels:{+-‖τ‖2 of SP}, {□-max(|τ|) of SP}, {°-‖τ‖2 of HAPM}, {△-max(|τ|) of HAPM})

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