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Research Papers

A Novel Fingertip Design for Slip Detection Under Dynamic Load Conditions

[+] Author and Article Information
Somer M. Nacy

Al-Khwarizmi College of Engineering,
University of Baghdad,
Baghdad, Iraq
e-mail: nacys2@asme.org

Mauwafak A. Tawfik

Mechanical Engineering Department,
University of Technology,
Baghdad, Iraq
e-mail: drmat19853@yahoo.com

Ihsan A. Baqer

Mechanical Engineering Department,
University of Technology,
Baghdad, Iraq
e-mail: ihsan.qadi@gmail.com

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Mechanisms and Robotics Committee of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF MECHANISMS AND ROBOTICS. Manuscript received July 13, 2013; final manuscript received March 14, 2014; published online April 21, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Philippe Wenger.

J. Mechanisms Robotics 6(3), 031009 (Apr 21, 2014) (7 pages) Paper No: JMR-13-1132; doi: 10.1115/1.4027237 History: Received July 13, 2013; Revised March 14, 2014

This paper presents a novel design of a fingertip mechanism for detecting the slippage of the grasped object under two different types of dynamic load. This design is to be used with an underactuated triple finger artificial hand based on pulleys-tendon mechanism and the grasped object is designed in a prism shape with three DC motors with unbalance rotating mass to generate the excitation in the object, these motors are distributed symmetrically on the faces of the object. This prism shaped object is connected to a rope type pulling system to force the object to slip under quasi-static load condition. The mathematical modeling has been derived for the proposed design to generate the signal of contact force components ratio through using the conventional sensors signals with the aid of matlabsimulink software. The experimental results are discussed in comparison with the physical aspect of slippage phenomenon and they show good agreement with the physical definition of the slippage phenomenon.

Copyright © 2014 by ASME
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Figures

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Fig. 1

The artificial hand mechanism

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Fig. 2

(a) and (b) Artificial hand model

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Fig. 3

(a) The grasped object, (b) and (c) the components of pulling system

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Fig. 4

The variation of force ratio (fti/fni) (sample 1, 1st test)

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Fig. 5

The applied load on the grasped object (sample 1, 1st test)

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Fig. 6

The normal force component (fni) (sample 1, 1st test)

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Fig. 7

The tangential force component (fti) (sample 1, 1st test)

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Fig. 8

The variation of force ratio (fti/fni) (sample 2, 1st test)

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Fig. 9

The applied load on the grasped object (sample 2, 1st test)

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Fig. 10

The normal force component (fni) (sample 2, 1st test)

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Fig. 11

The tangential force component (fti) (sample 2, 1st test)

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Fig. 12

The variation of force ratio (fti/fni) (sample 1, 2nd test)

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Fig. 13

The normal force component (fni) (sample 1, 2nd test)

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Fig. 14

The tangential force component (fti) (sample 1, 2nd test)

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Fig. 15

The variation of force ratio (fti/fni) (sample 2, 2nd test)

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Fig. 16

The normal force component (fni) (sample 2, 2nd test)

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Fig. 17

The tangential force component (fti) (sample 2, 2nd test)

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