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Research Papers

A Novel Deployable Hexahedron Mobile Mechanism Constructed by Only Prismatic Joints

[+] Author and Article Information
Wan Ding

e-mail: 10116306@bjtu.edu.cn

Yan-an Yao

e-mail: yayao@bjtu.edu.cn
School of Mechanical,
Electronic and Control Engineering,
Beijing Jiaotong University,
Beijing 100044, China

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Mechanisms and Robotics Committee of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF MECHANISMS AND ROBOTICS. Manuscript received November 15, 2012; final manuscript received August 14, 2013; published online October 10, 2013. Assoc. Editor: Yuefa Fang.

J. Mechanisms Robotics 5(4), 041016 (Oct 10, 2013) (16 pages) Paper No: JMR-12-1193; doi: 10.1115/1.4025410 History: Received November 15, 2012; Revised August 14, 2013

This paper proposes a novel deployable hexahedron mobile mechanism that is rigidly linked by only prismatic joints. The mechanism that is a completely symmetrical structure can always keep the walking capability when any of its six faces of the hexahedron touches the ground. It can roll at any stable state. The configuration constructed by only prismatic joints makes it expand and contract as a deployable structure. In this paper, a method for constructing a deployable hexahedron mobile mechanism is proposed. The stability analysis and dynamic simulation of the walking and rolling are carried out. The necessary condition of tipping motion and the speed analysis of two different rolling gaits are studied in details. A binary control strategy is adopted to simplify the complexity of the control system. A pneumatic cylinder is chosen to be the binary actuator. A prototype composed of 180 pneumatic cylinders was fabricated. The validity of the walking and tipping functions are verified by the experimental results.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Construction process of the deployable hexahedron mobile mechanism

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Fig. 2

A walking period: (a) initial state, (b) the first and second steps, (c) the third, fourth, and fifth steps, and (d) the sixth and seventh steps

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Fig. 3

Deployable hexahedron mobile mechanism: (a) the sketch diagram and (b) inner cube of the mechanism

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Fig. 4

Two coordinate frames

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Fig. 5

One of the most likely situations of tipping: (a) 3D model and (b) stability analysis

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Fig. 6

A period of walking simulation: (a) initial state, (b) the first to third steps, (c) the fourth to seventh steps, and (d) the eighth and ninth steps

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Fig. 7

The trajectory of WCMP'(x)−t

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Fig. 8

A period of tipping simulation: (a) initial state, (b) the first step (the first self-deformation), (c) the second step (the second self-deformation), (d) the third step (the third self-deformation), (e) the fourth step (the fourth self-deformation), (f) the fifth step, (g) the sixth step, (h) the seventh step, and (i) the eighth step (the fifth self-deformation)

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Fig. 11

Trajectory of the CM in a period of rolling motion

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Fig. 12

Stability analysis of three struts supporting: (a) simplified model of two states and (b) state II (3D model)

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Fig. 15

A tipping period by absorbing shock: (a) initial state, (b) the first step (the first self-deformation), (c) the second step (the second self-deformation), (d) the third step (the third self-deformation), (e) the fourth step, (f) the fifth step (the fourth self-deformation), and (g) the sixth step (the fifth self-deformation)

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Fig. 16

Binary codes of the walking gait simulation

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Fig. 17

Binary codes of the rolling gait simulation

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Fig. 18

Two ultimate states of the prototype: (a) the completely stowed state (1390 mm × 1390 mm × 1390 mm) and (b) the completely deployed state (2140 mm × 2140 mm × 2140 mm)

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Fig. 19

Snapshots of walking gaits: (a) initial state, (b) the first step, (c) the second step, (d) the third step, (e) the fourth step, (f) the fifth step, (g) the sixth step, (h) the seventh step, (i) the eighth step, and (j) the ninth step

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Fig. 20

Snapshots of tipping gaits: (a) initial state, (b) the first step, (c) the second step, (d) the third step, (e) the fourth step, (f) the fifth step, (g) the sixth step, (h) the seventh step, and (i) the eighth step

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