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Design Innovation Papers

A Family of Biped Mechanisms With Two Revolute and Two Cylindric Joints

[+] Author and Article Information
Chao Liu

School of Mechanical and Electronic Control Engineering,  Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044, Chinachaochaobjtu@gmail.com Patent Examination Cooperation Center of SIPO, Beijing 100190, Chinachaochaobjtu@gmail.com

Hui-Hui Yang

School of Mechanical and Electronic Control Engineering,  Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044, China Patent Examination Cooperation Center of SIPO, Beijing 100190, China

Yan-An Yao1

School of Mechanical and Electronic Control Engineering,  Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044, Chinayayao@bjtu.edu.cn

1

Corresponding author.

J. Mechanisms Robotics 4(4), 045002 (Aug 10, 2012) (13 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4007204 History: Received October 16, 2011; Revised April 29, 2012; Published August 10, 2012; Online August 10, 2012

A family of biped spatial four-link mechanisms with two revolute and two cylindric joints is proposed in this paper. Three main categories, including eight configurations are put forward. The primary feature of these mechanisms is that they are made up of four links that are connected end to end through two revolute and cylindric joints, and among the links, two of them are designed as feet. These novel configurations are revealed by different methods and ways: The basic configurations are enumerated by traditional mechanism synthesis method; the conventional configurations are obtained by repetitious trial; the unique configurations are accidentally achieved by inspiration or intuition. Each of them has its own characteristic and can be an alternative option for biped robot design. Compared with most of the existing biped mechanisms, these configurations are simpler in structure and thus easier to control. The singular configuration is cleverly used rather than avoided to perform the walking and turning. Their structure descriptions and walking simulations are accomplished. Afterwards, the kinematic and stability analyses are studied, the design considerations are discussed, and foot-workspace analyses are carried out. Finally, four prototypes are developed to preliminary verify the feasibility of these proposed concepts.

Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Topics: Mechanisms
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

The basic biped RCCR mechanism

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Figure 2

The major dimension parameters of the crank which employs a cylindric joint to connect the crank and the link 3

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Figure 3

Prototype of the basic biped RCCR mechanism

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Figure 4

The basic biped RCRC mechanism

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Figure 5

The basic biped CRRC mechanism

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Figure 6

The major dimension parameters of the crank which employs a revolute joint to connect the crank and the link 3

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Figure 7

The cross-foot biped RCCR mechanism

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Figure 8

The screw systems of the cross-foot biped RCCR mechanism

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Figure 9

The foot workspace of the cross-foot biped RCCR mechanism

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Figure 10

The locomotion phrases of the cross-foot biped RCCR mechanism along straight line paths and a curve path

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Figure 11

The support polygons and directions of the ZMP trajectories of the cross-foot biped RCCR mechanism

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Figure 12

The trajectory of ZMP following α, when the bigger foot is regarded as the support link and ω = 6π rad/s

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Figure 13

The trajectory of ZMP following α, when the smaller foot is regarded as the support link and ω=1.05 πrad/s

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Figure 14

The ZMP trajectory following α under different input angular velocities

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Figure 22

The coordination system and parameters of the upright biped CRRC mechanism

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Figure 23

The ZMP trajectory of the upright biped RCCR mechanism following different input angular velocities

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Figure 24

Simulation of the upright biped RCCR mechanism

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Figure 25

Prototype of the upright biped RCCR mechanism

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Figure 26

The track values of two feet along the z axis following the input angle α2

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Figure 31

The tracks of two feet along the z axis following the input actuator M1

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Figure 32

The turning principle of the parallel-axes biped RCCR mechanism

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Figure 33

The walking tracks of the parallel-axes biped RCCR mechanism

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Figure 34

The ZMP trajectory of the parallel-axes biped RCCR mechanism following different input angular velocities

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Figure 35

Simulation of the parallel-axes biped RCCR mechanism

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Figure 36

Prototype of the parallel-axes biped RCCR mechanism

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Figure 15

Simulation of the cross-foot biped RCCR mechanism

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Figure 16

Prototype of the cross-foot biped RCCR mechanism

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Figure 17

The tracks of two feet along the z axis

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Figure 18

Simulation of the basic biped RCRC mechanism

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Figure 19

The upright biped RCCR mechanism

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Figure 20

The upright biped RCRC mechanism

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Figure 21

The upright biped CRRC mechanism

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Figure 27

The foot workspace of the upright biped RCCR mechanism, when b=a/2

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Figure 28

The foot workspace of the upright biped RCCR mechanism, when b≠a/2

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Figure 29

Prototype of the parallel-axes biped RCCR mechanism

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Figure 30

The screw systems of the parallel-axes biped RCCR mechanism

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