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Design Innovation

Semicompliant Force Generator Mechanism Design for a Required Impact and Contact Forces

[+] Author and Article Information
Burak Demirel

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Mechatronic Graduate Program, MEKAR Laboratories, Istanbul Technical University, Gumussuyu, 34437 Istanbul, Turkeydemirelbu@yahoo.com

M. Tolga Emirler

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Mechatronic Graduate Program, MEKAR Laboratories, Istanbul Technical University, Gumussuyu, 34437 Istanbul, Turkeyemirler@itu.edu.tr

Ümit Sönmez1

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Mechatronic Graduate Program, MEKAR Laboratories, Istanbul Technical University, Gumussuyu, 34437 Istanbul, Turkeyusonitu@gmail.com

Ahmet Yörükoğlu

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Mechatronic Graduate Program, MEKAR Laboratories, Istanbul Technical University, Gumussuyu, 34437 Istanbul, Turkeyahmetyorukoglu84@gmail.com

1

Corresponding author.

J. Mechanisms Robotics 2(4), 045001 (Aug 30, 2010) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4002076 History: Received June 08, 2008; Revised May 24, 2010; Published August 30, 2010; Online August 30, 2010

A novel design of compliant slider-crank mechanism is introduced and utilized as an impact and contact-force generator. This class of compliant slider mechanisms incorporates an elastic coupler, which is an initially straight flexible beam and buckles when it hits the stopper. The elastic pin-pin coupler, a buckling beam, behaves as a rigid body prior to the impact pushing the rigid slider. At a certain crank angle, the slider hits a stopper generating an impact force. This force can be changed by regulating the angular velocity of the crank and by achieving a desired velocity of the slider. Moreover, after the impact when the slider establishes a permanent contact with the stopper, the maximum contact force can also be adjusted by calculating the coupler dimensions (the length, the width, the thickness, and the amount of compression). The contact duration, the crank angular rotation range, can also be changed and attuned in this mechanism by moving the location of the impacted object. Several mechanism designs with the same working principle are introduced. A prototype compliant slider-crank mechanism is constructed and proved the conceptual contributions of the mechanism.

Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Three configurations of the compliant slider-crank mechanism setup

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Figure 2

Another compliant ICFG mechanism design made from two pieces

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Figure 3

Slider-crank mechanism

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Figure 4

The FBD of the mechanism

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Figure 5

Elastic impact model

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Figure 6

The kinematic diagram of the compliant slider-crank mechanism at two positions

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Figure 7

Normalized load versus normalized displacement

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Figure 8

The slider generates a contact-force

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Figure 9

The impact-/contact-force magnitudes for a constant angular velocity ω2=2.0 rad/s (case 1)

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Figure 10

The required power of the mechanism for case 1

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Figure 11

The impact-/contact-force magnitudes for a ramp angular velocity input (0.5–5.5 rad/s) (case 2)

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Figure 12

Maximum stress history of the buckling beam

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Figure 13

The compliant slider-crank prototype mechanism

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Figure 14

Schematics of the slider-crank mechanism

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Figure 15

The rigid mode of the slider-crank mechanism

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Figure 16

Crank angular velocity (2.5 V input)

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Figure 17

Slider position (2.5 V Input)

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Figure 18

Slider’s velocity filtered results (2.5 V input)

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Figure 19

(a) Absolute value of f1(bstp,kstp) function representing Eq. 38 (b) Solution domain of f1(bstp,kstp) and f2(bstp,kstp) planes representing Eqs. 38,39.

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Figure 20

Force history results comparing the experiment and the simulation (2.5V input-1.15 rad/s)

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Figure 21

Force history results comparing the experiment and the simulation (2.9V input-1.45 rad/s)

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Figure 22

Zoom in to the first hump in Fig. 1, case 1 (2.5 V)

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Figure 23

A new design of the compliant ICFG suitable for both macro and MEMS applications

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